links for 2011-02-18

  • Then on Tuesday, someone posted it on Flickr. Subsequently, Peter Kafka of Wall Street Journal's MediaMemo noticed it and passed it along to Jay Yarow, who made it Business Insider’s Chart of the Day on Wednesday, citing Kafka and the Flickr post. On Thursday, the excellent John Gruber at Daring Fireball linked to it and between those two postings the chart garnered a fair bit of attention, including from the likes of apparent digital music expert Bob Lefsetz (“First in Music Analysis”). No one seems to have tracked it back to the original source nor noticed what happened to catch my eye straight away:
  • Like most photographers, I am constantly tweaking and trying to improve upon my website. It is my calling card and brings me over 90% of my professional photography business. In my never-ending pursuit of a perfect website, I have come across many highs and lows over the years. Clearly there are more than ten things that can hurt a website, but in general, this list touches on the things I come across often when viewing a new photographer’s site. I don’t profess to have the perfect website, nor do I know anyone who does. But looking at it from the consumer’s point of view, there are some basic things you’ll want to avoid if you want to attract quality clients. Here’s some “tough love.”
  • Getting average internet users to give up their email addresses is easy. You just offer a free ring tone or Brintney Spears computer wallpaper and they hand over their addresses.

    With tech founders, on the other hand, you have to earn every ounce of trust and work hard for every single email. Which is why I think it’s so impressive that StartupDigest, an upstart that’s been around for about a year, managed to grow its email list to 100,000 subscriptions.

    I invited Chris McCann to teach how his company did it.

  • [AUDIO] Getting average internet users to give up their email addresses is easy. You just offer a free ring tone or Brintney Spears computer wallpaper and they hand over their addresses.

    With tech founders, on the other hand, you have to earn every ounce of trust and work hard for every single email. Which is why I think it’s so impressive that StartupDigest, an upstart that’s been around for about a year, managed to grow its email list to 100,000 subscriptions.

    I invited Chris McCann to teach how his company did it.

This entry was posted in Delicious and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.